Illinois Council on Developmental Disabilities
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Governor Pat Quinn
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Council Policies

 

The Illinois Council on Developmental Disabilities has adopted policies in various life areas. Please click below to view our policies.


ILLINOIS COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

POLICY TITLE: CHILD CARE

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates for a quality childcare system that provides before school, after school and out-of-school care in environments that promote inclusion of children with and without disabilities.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • Quality child care is a necessity, not a luxury.
  • It is the right of children with disabilities to grow up in typical settings with their typical peers and to attend local, neighborhood child care programs with other children who may or may not experience disabilities.
  • Children with disabilities need equal access to community programs including child care, day care homes, preschools, and after school programs designed for children without disabilities.
  • It is important that fiscal policies and regulations for child care programs be designed so that child care is available, affordable and accessible to children with disabilities.
  • The childcare system needs to ensure there are a sufficient number of consistent, nurturing caregivers who are fairly compensated.
  • Child care staff need to be trained and have the necessary supports and aids to ensure that children with disabilities participate with their peers in day care settings.
  • The environment of quality child care includes: a safe, physically accessible, cheerful place; developmentally and culturally appropriate materials; low child/helper ratio to allow for individualized attention and small group activities; adequate and nutritious food; strong parental involvement, education and support; and community support from public and private sector individuals and organizations.
DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Child Care-Related Activities: The term "child care-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in families of children with developmental disabilities having access to and use of child care services, including before-school, after-school, and out-of-school services, in their communities.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.
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POLICY TITLE: COMMUNITY SUPPORTS AND HOUSING

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates that all persons with developmental disabilities have the fundamental right to live, work, and spend leisure time in natural community settings where friendships and other relationships can occur.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • Integration occurs when persons with disabilities share natural environments with all citizens within local communities.
  • People need choice of how, where and with whom they want to live as well as the provision of services and supports.
  • Services and supports should be designed to meet the preferences, needs, wants, and desires as expressed by consumers.
  • Access to services and supports must not be limited to one provider when other choices are available; nor shall receipt of one type of service or support bind the individual to receipt of all service or support from that provider. Choice of service and support should be well informed, and must include direct experience in the options from which the individual will make a choice or decision.

  • Services and supports for people with developmental disabilities must be of the highest possible quality and shall promote independence, productivity, and integration.
  • Supports and services should be provided by generic service providers to the greatest extent possible.
  • Eligibility for services and supports from community providers shall not be contingent upon the ability to make contributions to that provider in the form of monetary or property.
  • Community residences shall be comparable in size, design, scale and decorum with others in the immediate neighborhood.
  • The Council supports visitibility standards, which provide basic accessibility features for people with disabilities in all newly constructed homes.
  • The Council supports the development of an orderly closing of institutions which will allow for the most integrated living arrangement for all persons with disabilities.
RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Community Supports: The term community supports refers to services available or offered to individuals in a community that affect their quality of life.

Housing-Related Activities: The term "housing-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities having access to and use of housing and housing supports and services in their communities, including assistance related to renting, owning, or modifying an apartment or home.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.

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POLICY TITLE: EARLY INTERVENTION

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates for an early intervention system where all infants and toddlers who have, or are at risk for, significant delays are identified and connected to appropriate, family centered, individualized early intervention services.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • The first five years of a child's life represents a period of rapid physical, intellectual, social and emotional development.
  • Early intervention can reduce the sense of isolation, stress and frustration that families may experience.
  • Intervention can prevent the occurrence of some disabilities and increase developmental and educational gains for children experiencing, or at risk of, developmental delays or disabilities. As a result of early intervention, children with developmental delays grow up to become productive, independent individuals.
  • The goals of early intervention are to enhance the child's development and support families as central in their child's life.
  • Early intervention reduces the lifetime costs of special education, rehabilitation and medical care.
  • Early intervention services should be provided through an independent service coordination system.
  • Early intervention services should include, at a minimum, educational, health related, developmental, and family support services, as stated in an Individual Family Service Plan, delivered by qualified personnel.
  • Early intervention services must be coordinated to assure comprehensive services to children with developmental disabilities and their families.
  • Early intervention services should be provided in natural settings where infants and toddlers without disabilities are found, including home and community settings.
  • Parents choose where services are provided. Early intervention services must be structured so that they are easy for families to understand and use.
RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Early Intervention Activities: The term "early intervention activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities provided to individuals described in paragraph (8)(B) and their families to enhance-

A. the development of the individuals to maximize their potential; and
B. the capacity of families to meet the special needs of the individuals.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.

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POLICY TITLE: EDUCATION

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates for an educational system that stresses teaching in integrated, age-appropriate school and community environments that will be useful to the individual student now and in the future.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • The role of education in the lives of people with developmental disabilities is critical, for this system serves students during their important developmental years.
  • In addition to the core curriculum, programs for all students should incorporate instruction in social skills, problem-solving, decision-making and self-advocacy.
  • Curriculum and instruction should stress useful age-appropriate skills, enhance independence and help all students gain a measure of control over meeting their own basic needs.
  • Enabling all students to increase their independence requires having high expectations for their ability to learn and for their eventual participation in adult society. The meaningful participation of adults with disabilities as role models to all students is critical to this process.
  • Each student's education should be individually tailored and should employ supports and services including, but not limited to, assistive devices, augmentative communication systems, and current technology, as needed.
  • Students with disabilities have the right and must have the opportunity to be educated in the same educational environments as any other student.
  • All school facilities and programs should be completely accessible.
  • Any services or supports needed to accommodate a student's disabilities should be brought into the general education environment, and should be individually designed and implemented for each student.
  • Specialized services must be provided for each student, as needed, within the regular school environment.
  • All possible opportunities to join in the social and extra-curricular experiences of school life must be provided to students with developmental disabilities.
  • The school's role in promoting independence for its students should begin as early as possible, with curricular and extra-curricular activities designed to teach students communication and social skills; to familiarize them with basic work concepts, various jobs and careers; and to have opportunities to contribute to others.
  • Formal transition planning for students with disabilities should begin as early as possible, but no later than age 14 ½ .
  • Transition planning and services must be highly action oriented and involve a partnership among students, family members, educators, classmates, friends, employers, adult service professionals and other community members in order to assist students to achieve their desired future.
  • Educational planning and services must reflect a student's own goals for life after high school and the supports and services that may be needed to fulfill those goals.
  • Transition planning focuses on outcomes that will enhance the quality of life experiences and the contributions made by persons with disabilities.

RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Education-Related Activities: The term "education-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities being able to access appropriate supports and modification when necessary, to maximize their educational potential, to benefit from lifelong educational activities, and to be integrated and included in all facets of student life.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.

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POLICY TITLE: EMPLOYMENT

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates for the opportunity for all individuals who want jobs to be productively employed without jeopardizing other rights or benefits that assure them necessary continuing support.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • It is in the interest of society to act affirmatively in making employment opportunities and necessary support services available to persons with disabilities.
  • Employees with disabilities have the right and should be afforded the same opportunity for career development and retirement planning as other employees.
  • Employment should be in typical work settings rather than in segregated, sheltered programs.
  • Employment should occur in environments that offer the opportunity for integration with peers without disabilities.
  • The proportion of employees with disabilities to employees without disabilities in the workplace should be consistent with the general population.
  • Employees with developmental disabilities should be paid in accordance with the Fair Labor Standards Act and have the same benefits as are offered to workers without disabilities.
  • The goal of all supports is to enable the individual to engage productively in meaningful work. The degree and kind of support should be individualized, flexible and available to the extent necessary for the individual to remain employed.
  • Every effort should be made to demonstrate the economic importance and viability of supported employment so that its job creation and development possibilities will be understood by the business and economic developmental leaders of the state and community.

RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 103-402):

Employment-Related Activities: The term "employment-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities acquiring, retaining, or advancing in paid employment, including supported employment or self-employment, in integrated settings in a community.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.
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POLICY TITLE: HEALTH

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates for health care for persons with developmental disabilities and their families encompasses the following principles: non-discrimination; comprehensiveness; appropriateness; equity and efficiency. Health care is an inalienable human right and equitable access to compassionate, quality health care must be affirmed in public policy and law.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • Traditionally, health care has been viewed as hospital care and physician services. Health care must be defined in a broader context. Health promotion and disease prevention services, rehabilitation services, home and community-based services, personal and support services, mental health services, oral health, hearing and vision services, and assistive technology must be recognized as essential components of health care since such services maintain or increase functional capacity and enhance the ability to participate more fully in community life.
  • A non-discriminatory health care system will assure that people with disabilities of all ages and their families are able to fully participate in the nation's health care system.
  • A quality health care system ensures a wide array of health, rehabilitation, personal, and support services across all services categories and sites of service delivery.
  • A quality health care system assures that comprehensive health, rehabilitation, personal, and support services are provided on the basis of individual need, preference, and choice.
  • A quality health care system will not discriminate according to an assessment of risk or ability to pay.
  • A quality health care system assures the right to make advance directives regarding end of life medical decisions.
  • A quality health care system ensures services that promote the health, safety, and welfare of the individuals it serves.
  • An efficient health care system is one that will maximize efficient, effective quality of care and minimizes administrative waste.
  • Any health, behavioral health, or medical care recommendations are based upon an individual's right to choose, and a comprehensive, individualized assessment including a medical evaluation, treatment plan, and continuing monitoring. These recommendations are provided in a manner to promote informed choices/consent, and an understanding of options and risks.

RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Health-Related Activities: The term "health-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities
having access to and use of coordinated health, dental, mental health, and other human and social services, including prevention activities in their communities.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.
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POLICY TITLE: RECREATION AND LEISURE

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates for equal opportunities to and the necessary supports for the participation of all citizens in recreational, leisure and social activities within their communities.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • Recreational, leisure and social activities have historically had a lower priority in resource allocation than those of education, employment and living arrangements. But these opportunities are as essential to persons with developmental disabilities as they are to those without. The skills and attitudes gained through these opportunities enhance the perception of self worth and abilities needed to live, learn and work in the community.
  • The development of an appropriate leisure lifestyle is an integral part of independent functioning and is unique to each person. Recreational, leisure and social activities need to be included in every person's education, transition, rehabilitation or similar plan.
  • Providing a wide array of recreational, leisure and social experiences is essential in order that persons with developmental disabilities may choose and communicate their desires for participation.
  • Efforts should be made to include people with developmental disabilities in all aspects of leisure/recreation planning by actively seeking their opinions and personal participation on advisory boards and boards or directors or any other body that has decision making authority.
  • Recreational, leisure and social activities and programs that are labeled as "special" and "adaptive" needlessly isolate persons with developmental disabilities.
  • Segregated recreational, leisure and social activities have created attitudinal and physical barriers and should be discouraged.
  • Restrictive funding and certification rules and local community agency procedures may create barriers to participation in integrated activities.
  • Limited incomes often preclude participation in community recreational, leisure and social activities.
  • Increased efforts and resource allocation should be directed to integrated activities.
  • Professionals must support the access to and participation in recreational, leisure and social activities in the community by people with developmental disabilities.
  • It is essential to support people with disabilities who want access to integrated, community leisure activities by advocating for changes in restrictive rules and procedures in buildings and houses where persons with disabilities reside. Additionally, appropriate clothing and grooming will provide not only access, but also acceptance in integrated activities.
  • A stronger alliance among formal organizations and informal networks will help ensure access to community recreational, leisure and social activities for persons with developmental disabilities.
  • Educating family members, with whom people with disabilities live, about the value of integrated leisure activities will help with the planning and provision of appropriate and adequate supports for participation.
  • Training of, but not limited to, volunteers, recreation coaches, activity directors, park district employees, family members, educators, and organizers of public and private leisure/recreation opportunities in the community will help provide appropriate access, accommodation and support to people with disabilities.

RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Recreation-Related Activities: The term "recreational-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities having access to and use of recreational, leisure, and social activities, in their communities.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.
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POLICY TITLE: TRANSPORTATION

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Council advocates that all persons with developmental disabilities have access to all publicly funded and/or regulated transportation services.

BELIEFS AND CONDITIONS:

  • Within our society, freedom of movement is an essential component of any effort to enable all citizens to live as independently as they choose; to engage in productive self-sustaining activity; and, most importantly, to be fully integrated within their communities.
  • A transportation system must meet the needs of citizens in an accessible and affordable fashion and people using the system must know how to access the system.
  • Government, at all levels, must develop accessible and affordable transportation options including paratransit for people with disabilities and others dependent on public transportation.
  • Paratransit systems for people with disabilities must be understood as a necessary component of, but not as a substitute for, accessible public transportation.
  • Transit personnel are key to the success of transportation systems and must be trained and sensitive to the transportation needs of people with disabilities and support people with disabilities in gaining access to transportation services.

RELATED DEFINITIONS FROM THE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ASSISTANCE AND BILL OF RIGHTS ACT OF 2000 (PL 106-402):

Transportation-Related Activities: The term "transportation-related activities" means advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities having access to and use of transportation.

Self-Determination Activities: The term "self-determination activities" means activities that result in individuals with developmental disabilities, with appropriate assistance, having-

A. the ability and opportunity to communicate and make personal decisions;
B. the ability and opportunity to communicate choices and exercise control over the type and intensity of services, supports, and other assistance the individuals receive;
C. the authority to control resources to obtain needed services, supports, and other assistance;
D. opportunities to participate in, and contribute to, their communities; and
E. support, including financial support, to advocate for themselves and others, to develop leadership skills, through training in self-advocacy, to participate in coalitions, to educate policymakers, and to play a role in the development of public policies that affect individuals with developmental disabilities.