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Child Abuse Hotline
800-25-ABUSE
(800-252-2873)

217-785-4020
(for international calls only)

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(Advocacy Office)
800-232-3798
217-524-2029

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877-746-0829
312-328-2779

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800-624-KIDS
(800-624-5437)

Adoption Information
800-572-2390

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800-232-3798

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866-503-0184
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Agencies, Boards & Commissions

Inspector General
800-722-9124

Chicago Administrative Headquarters
100 West Randolph Street 6-200
Chicago IL 60601
312.814.6800
TTD 312.814.8783

Springfield Administrative Headquarters
406 East Monroe
Springfield IL 62701-1498
217.785.2509
TTD 217.785.6605

Media Inquiries/ Communications Office
312-814-6847

Illinois Putative Father Registry

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

Illinois Amber Alert

Illinois Employer Report Form

  Reforms  

The Department also supports a wide variety of adoption reform efforts. The B.H. Consent Decree Reform Panel convened in April 1993 to perform a thorough review of adoption policies and procedures. Its final recommendations on 10 major areas of adoption reform were presented in December 1993. These areas included:

(1) the early identification of children for adoption;

(2) the preparation of children for adoption;

(3) the screening of prospective adoptive families to assess their suitability;

(4) the screening of prospective adoptive parents who wish to adopt children with special needs;

(5) transracial and transcultural placements;

(6) the preparation of adoptive homes;

(7) training programs for adoptive parents;

(8) legal risk placements;

(9) providing information regarding the child to adoptive parents; and

(10) the establishment of a two-tier process for adoption referrals. Much attention was focused on streamlining the process of formally terminating parental rights in court, a necessary step before a child can be placed for adoption.

Beginning in early 1994, caseloads involving children waiting to be adopted were transferred to follow-up adoption teams who specialize in these cases. Cases scheduled for adoption screening that appear to be appropriate for adoption services will be reviewed at the same time for transfer into the adoption teams.

Many reforms in the adoption process over the past several years were the result of work performed by the volunteer committee, Project HEART (Helping to Ease Adoption Red Tape).  The final report of Project HEART at a February 1993 press conference. Accomplishments listed in the report included a reduction in the time required to process fingerprints for prospective adoptive families, the establishment of two new courtrooms in Cook County to hear cases involving the termination of parental rights, the issuing of medical assistance cards annually instead of monthly, greater public awareness about children waiting to be adopted generated by a media campaign, the creation of a statewide newsletter devoted to adoption recruitment, and the commission of a study to determine the effectiveness of post-adoption services. In September 1993, Project HEART distributed a resource book for adoptive families in Illinois. The resource book was given to adoptive parent organizations, child welfare agencies and callers to the Adoption Information Center of Illinois. Project HEART was underwritten by Aon of Chicago, Fel-Pro Inc. of Skokie, Household International of Prospect Heights and WGN-TV in Chicago.

Reforms have also included improvements in training programs. Once reforms are in place statewide, all potential adoptive parents will receive at least 75 hours of training under the Foster Pride/Adopt Pride training program, plus an additional 12 hours of specialized training in the Department's adoption certification curriculum. Field testing for the Foster Pride/Adopt Pride curriculum was conducted in July 1994. Forty-three of the original 51 families completed the program. Staff training began in early August. And in late 1994, staff from the National Adoption Resource Center field tested the adoption certification curriculum, called "Making the Commitment to Adoption."

DCFS Wards
Adopted
FY 1976-2007
Fiscal Year Adoptions
Consummated
2007
1,682
2006
1,670
2005
1,867
2004
2,137
2003
2,795
2002
3,393
2001
4,208
2000
6,281
1999
7,275
1998
4,293
1997
2,229
1996
1,961
1995
1,640
1994
1,200
1993
1,034
1992
724
1991
708
1990
788
1989
719
1988
718
1987
714
1986
763
1985
812
1984
945
1983
900
1982
798
1981
555
1980
475
1979
471
1978
558
1977
762
1976
1,029

Adoption Links

Legal Resources
Illinois Licensed Adoption Agencies
DCFS Provides Adoption Subsidies To Eligible Non-Wards
Reforms
Legislation
Illinois Adoption Advisory Council
Adoption Information Center of Illinois (outside link)
Confidential Intermediary Services of Illinois (outside link)
Midwest Adoption Center (outside link)
Illinois Putative Father Registry (outside link)
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